Category Archives: Synthesis

Propellor Sound Synthesis at Audio Mostly

Recently, at the Audio Mostly 2017 conference, my work with Rod Selfridge and Josh Reiss was published on Propellor Sound Synthesis. I was both published at the conference, on the conference organising committee, as a the webmaster and a member of the music team.More information is available here on the Intelligent Sound Engineering Blog, and an example of the propellor synthesis is available on youtube.

Sound Effects in Post Production

It has been quite a while since I have posted, but I hope to resolve that shortly with a number of academic papers being published this summer,

In the meantime, there is some discussion over the use of sound effects in port production, and the fundamental fact that many things you hear as part of a soundscape are not the original recorded sound – this is the one of the fundamental justifications for my PhD and this is very well explained in this TED Talk:

https://www.ted.com/talks/tasos_frantzolas_everything_you_hear_on_film_is_a_lie

 

 

AES61 Audio for Games

The 61th International Conference of the Audio Engineering Society on Audio for Games took place in London from 10 to 12 February. This is the fifth edition of the Audio for Games conference which features a mixture of invited talks and academic paper sessions. Traditionally a biennial event, by popular demand the conference was organised in 2016 again following a very successful 4th edition in 2015.

Christian Heinrichs presented work from his doctoral research with Andrew McPherson, discussing Digital Foley and introducing FoleyDesigner, which allows for effectively using human gestures to control sound effects models.

I presented a paper in the Synthesis and Sound Design paper session, on weapon sound synthesis and my colleague William Wilkinson presented work on mammalian growls, both of which can be found in the conference proceedings.  

Furthermore, Xavier Serra and Frederic Font presented the Audio Commons project and how the creative industries could benefit from and get access to content with liberal licenses

Along with presenting work at this conference, I was also involved as the technical coordinator and webmaster for the Audio for Games community.

More information about the conference can be found on the conference website.

DAFx Day 3

Day three of the Digital Audio Effects Conference (DAFx15) began with an excellent introduction and summary of Wave Digital filters and Digital Wave Guides by Kurt Werner and Julius O. Smith from CCRMA, in which the current state of the art in physical modelling no nonlinearities was presented and some potential avenues for future exploration was discussed. Following on from this work was discussed

DAFx Day 2

Photo from http://www.ntnu.edu/web/dafx15/dafx15 Photo by Jørn Adde © Trondheim kommune

Day two of DAFx conference in Trondheim NTNU opened with Marije Baalmans keynote on the range of hardware and software audio effects and synthesisers are available to artists, and how different artists utilise these effects. This talk was focused primarily on small embedded systems that artists use, such as Arduino, Beaglebone Black and Raspberry Pi. Later in the day, some excellent work including:

AES Presentation on Owl Guitar Pedal

Martin Klang presented a talk on Open Source Entrepreneurship and the OWL discussing the OWL guitar pedal, creation through to production.

He discussed how the crowd funding sources, how to budget for small start up projects. The importance of open source, both in terms of software and hardware was discussed at length, and is a vital aspect of what the OWL team set out to do.

The OWL is a custom build programmable guitar effects pedal that allows anyone to write their own effect pedal and load it onto the standalone program. Effects can be written in C++, Faust or even Pure Data (PD). There is also a wrapper that allows users to run their patches as a VST or AU within a Digital Audio Workstation and in the future, it will also be possible to run patches in the browser. Recently a modular synthesiser version of the Owl has also been released.

Hoxton Owl Guitar Pedal

Listening In The Wild

Today, 28th August 2015, C4DM presented a one day workshop entitled Listening In The Wild, organised by Dan Stowell, Bob Sturm and Emmanouil Benetos.

The morning session presented a range of research including sound event detection using NMF and DTW techniques, understanding detectability variations of species and habitats, animal vocalisation synthesis through probabilistic models.

The post lunch session saw discussion on vocal modelling and analysis working towards understanding how animals produce their given associated sounds. Following this there was further discussion on NMF followed by work on using bird songs as part of a musical composition.

The poster session included work on auditory scene analysis, bird population vocalisation variations, CHiME: a sound source recognition dataset, technology assisted animal population size measures, bird identification through the use of identity vectors, and DTW for bird song dissimilarity.

Further information on the presenters and posters is avaliable here

Visiting Researcher

Over the past month, I have been working closely with visiting researcher Luca Turchet [http://www.lucaturchet.it/].

We have been working on perceptual evaluation of synthesised footstep sounds. Within the experiment that we ran, participants put on shoes with sensors mounted in them. The sound of different floor surfaces and shoe types is then synthesised, through quality noise blocking headphones, and the participants are then asked to shape the spectral content with the aid of some very basic audio filters.

The intended outcome is to identify the extent to which different participants will vary the spectral characteristics of their footsteps.

Further updates on this research to follow.